First, you collect the opt-in, which 9 times out of 10 will be a 'cold lead', ie., someone (NOT) familiar with you or what you represent. So instead of immediately going into full-on presentation mode, which isn't good for you or your prospect, you create a buffer where the prospect can learn more about YOU in a safe space. The reason this is important nowadays is because your prospect is more interested in you, your story and why you choose to align with your primary program, even more so than his or hers interest in the biz opp itself.

Remember to incorporate your SMS marketing effort as part of your overall marketing plan. Ring activity on the greater part of your marketing items, print and advanced, welcoming clients to join your SMS hover by messaging a message or code to your telephone number (in return for a rebate, complimentary gift, or another reward). This will widen your client base and also expanding deals.
One key criterion for provisioning is that the consumer opts into the service. The mobile operators demand a double opt in from the consumer and the ability for the consumer to opt out of the service at any time by sending the word STOP via SMS. These guidelines are established in the CTIA Playbook and the MMA Consumer Best Practices Guidelines[17] which are followed by all mobile marketers in the United States. In Canada, opt in will be mandatory once the Fighting Internet and Wireless Spam Act comes in force in mid-2012.

Many MGAs have found SMS to be the business partner to help them succeed. We offer full back-office support, including contracting, certification, supplies and new business status. Our credibility with carriers means you can turn to us to help resolve problems with clients and/or commissions. We do not recruit your agents nor use your client records for anything other than to support your efforts.

We’re firm believers that the follow-up is one of the most important elements of the selling process. After you fire off an email looking for an approval or confirmation, a short follow-up by text could be the perfect nudge to get your prospect to take a look. Remember, since 90 percent of text messages are read within a few minutes, there’s a good chance your SMS follow-up will be seen right away and prompt your prospect to answer.

The idea is that by collecting a database of subscribers we are obtaining their prior permission before we actually send them any marketing information. It means the people you send to will already know you, they have already told you they are interested in what you have to say. It’s called permission marketing, loads of books have been written on the subject, if you want one try Permission Marketing by Seth Godin.


It’s mobile marketing month here at Insivia and one of the questions we always get from out clients is whether or not our clients should be capturing mobile phone numbers from their customers to use in future forms of SMS marketing. A lot of the times it’s thought of being too intrusive but I’m here to tell you otherwise. For a lot of businesses collecting mobile phone numbers is a great opportunity for you. With SMS messaging over 95% of all SMS text messages that are sent are opened by the end user. As opposed to email where it’s about 6-15% of those emails are read. Mobile marketing and text message marketing is a great opportunity to directly interact with your customer. One of the best ways to do it is to include an opt-in for a mobile phone number on your opt in forms and your other marketing materials giving your customers the ability to give you their phone number to receive SMS interactions from your business. One of the things that I would not recommend is making this a mandatory requirement for people to give you their cell phone number but leave it to them as an option. If somebody wants to receive mobile messages from you, you want to give them an opportunity because the success rate is so high when working with SMS and direct message marketing.
Location-based services (LBS) are offered by some cell phone networks as a way to send custom advertising and other information to cell-phone subscribers based on their current location. The cell-phone service provider gets the location from a GPS chip built into the phone, or using radiolocation and trilateration based on the signal-strength of the closest cell-phone towers (for phones without GPS features). In the United Kingdom, which launched location-based services in 2003, networks do not use trilateration; LBS uses a single base station, with a "radius" of inaccuracy, to determine a phone's location.
Due to the dynamic nature of (SMS/MMS) marketing technology and the messaging industry, the Messaging Compliance Rules are constantly being updated from time to time. As a result, I’d strongly encourage clients to review vendors’ terms and conditions and proposed use cases with qualified legal counsel to make sure that they comply with all applicable laws.
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