In the competitive consumer-focused world of marketing and advertising, businesses rely on your marketing or ad agency’s creativity and experience to help them outshine their competition and attract new leads. Your agency must demonstrate consistent success and a thorough understanding of consumers across industries in order to win new bids and maintain and grow existing contracts. How will you do it?

If you’re working with CM.com’s platform, use the Address Book to randomly divide your recipients into two marketing groups. Create two separate campaigns, one for version A and one for version B. Keep everything in the campaigns the same except for the element you want to test. Set up your message, implement the changes in version B, randomly add one of the recipient groups to campaign A and add the other to campaign B. Send your message, and wait for the results to come in.  

Kaplan categorizes mobile marketing along the degree of consumer knowledge and the trigger of communication into four groups: strangers, groupies, victims, and patrons. Consumer knowledge can be high or low and according to its degree organizations can customize their messages to each individual user, similar to the idea of one-to-one marketing. Regarding the trigger of communication, Kaplan differentiates between push communication, initiated by the organization, and pull communication, initiated by the consumer. Within the first group (low knowledge/push), organizations broadcast a general message to a large number of mobile users. Given that the organization cannot know which customers have ultimately been reached by the message, this group is referred to as "strangers". Within the second group (low knowledge/pull), customers opt to receive information but do not identify themselves when doing so. The organizations therefore does not know which specific clients it is dealing with exactly, which is why this cohort is called "groupies". In the third group (high knowledge/push) referred to as "victims", organizations know their customers and can send them messages and information without first asking permission. The last group (high knowledge/pull), the "patrons" covers situations where customers actively give permission to be contacted and provide personal information about themselves, which allows for one-to-one communication without running the risk of annoying them.[45]
You will have a greater chance of gaining access to their mobile number by following these guidelines. You can collect their numbers using a sign-up sheet at your register, asking them when talking on the phone, allowing them to submit a form on your website, or by giving them a number that they can text to subscribe to your SMS messages. Whatever you do, keep a copy of their permission to market to them via SMS, if you run into problems you will be glad you did.
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