Non-Latin based languages, like Chinese, and also emojis use a different encoding process called Unicode or Unicode Transformation Format (UTF-8). It is meant to encompass all characters for efficiency but has a caveat. Each unicode character is 16 bits in size, which takes more information to send, therefore limiting SMS messages to 70 characters. Messages that are larger than 70 characters are also concatenated. These messages can fit 67 characters, and can be concatenated up to 4 times for a maximum of 268 characters.

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Kaplan categorizes mobile marketing along the degree of consumer knowledge and the trigger of communication into four groups: strangers, groupies, victims, and patrons. Consumer knowledge can be high or low and according to its degree organizations can customize their messages to each individual user, similar to the idea of one-to-one marketing. Regarding the trigger of communication, Kaplan differentiates between push communication, initiated by the organization, and pull communication, initiated by the consumer. Within the first group (low knowledge/push), organizations broadcast a general message to a large number of mobile users. Given that the organization cannot know which customers have ultimately been reached by the message, this group is referred to as "strangers". Within the second group (low knowledge/pull), customers opt to receive information but do not identify themselves when doing so. The organizations therefore does not know which specific clients it is dealing with exactly, which is why this cohort is called "groupies". In the third group (high knowledge/push) referred to as "victims", organizations know their customers and can send them messages and information without first asking permission. The last group (high knowledge/pull), the "patrons" covers situations where customers actively give permission to be contacted and provide personal information about themselves, which allows for one-to-one communication without running the risk of annoying them.[45]
As the name implies, shared virtual numbers are shared by many different senders. They’re usually free, but they can’t receive SMS replies, and the number changes from time to time without notice or consent. Senders may have different shared virtual numbers on different days, which may make it confusing or untrustworthy for recipients depending on the context. For example, shared virtual numbers may be suitable for 2 factor authentication text messages, as recipients are often expecting these text messages, which are often triggered by actions that the recipients make. But for text messages that the recipient isn’t expecting, like a sales promotion, a dedicated virtual number may be preferred.
 The advantage of utilizing a shape, regardless of whether paper or online, is that you can utilize it to decide client inclinations with a specific end goal to enable you to arrange your telephone records. For example, in case you’re a spa that offers an assortment of administrations, you may request that the client verify which administrations they are most inspired by. Instant messages are less demanding to

Collecting phone numbers at your brick and mortar place of business is as simple as filling out forms or collecting business cards, but what about online? Again, that can be as simple as asking customers to email or text you their information, or you can go high-tech and actually set up an online form, linked from your website, Facebook page, or even advertising links.


Location-based services (LBS) are offered by some cell phone networks as a way to send custom advertising and other information to cell-phone subscribers based on their current location. The cell-phone service provider gets the location from a GPS chip built into the phone, or using radiolocation and trilateration based on the signal-strength of the closest cell-phone towers (for phones without GPS features). In the United Kingdom, which launched location-based services in 2003, networks do not use trilateration; LBS uses a single base station, with a "radius" of inaccuracy, to determine a phone's location.
There are essentially three major trends in mobile gaming right now: interactive real-time 3D games, massive multi-player games and social networking games. This means a trend towards more complex and more sophisticated, richer game play. On the other side, there are the so-called casual games, i.e. games that are very simple and very easy to play. Most mobile games today are such casual games and this will probably stay so for quite a while to come.

By now, you have a pretty clear idea of what you need to improve to reach your goal. But how are you going to do that? You need to form a hypothesis about what you think would work better than the message you have now. You may already have some ideas about things that might work based on previous experiences. Or you may have no idea where to start. You can start with evaluating some email/SMS marketing best practices and see whether these would fit for your business. You will only know whether these are suitable for you once you start testing, but it gives you a solid starting point. 
Leads are not really leads or appointments. They are calls that have little information to the owner as to why you are coming just that you are “stopping by”. You will be told you have a set protected territory only to find that there is a rep already in the territory for months. And your territory has been worked by roving reps for years. Be prepared to be thrown out of businesses that had horrible experiences with this company or one of its affiliates, IPA, GPS and other 3 letter acronyms to disguise themselves.

In the article cited at the beginning of this post, the author boldly claims that “a major chunk of the population is already registered with the DND.” First, there is no clear statistical research backing up this assumption. Second, in the U.S., the Do Not Call registry protects consumers from just that — unwanted calls. It’s designed to prevent telemarketers from harassing consumers. This has absolutely nothing to do with text messaging. Now, if for some reason you do find yourself receiving unwanted text messages, you can file a complaint. But, knowing the permission-based nature of this marketing method, you may never confront this issue.

Over the past few years SMS marketing has become a legitimate advertising channel in some parts of the world. This is because unlike email over the public internet, the carriers who police their own networks have set guidelines and best practices for the mobile media industry (including mobile advertising). The IAB (Interactive Advertising Bureau) and the Mobile Marketing Association (MMA), as well, have established guidelines and are evangelizing the use of the mobile channel for marketers. While this has been fruitful in developed regions such as North America, Western Europe and some other countries, mobile SPAM messages (SMS sent to mobile subscribers without a legitimate and explicit opt-in by the subscriber) remain an issue in many other parts of the world, partly due to the carriers selling their member databases to third parties. In India, however, government's efforts of creating National Do Not Call Registry have helped cellphone users to stop SMS advertisements by sending a simple SMS or calling 1909.[5][6]
If you’re working with CM.com’s platform, use the Address Book to randomly divide your recipients into two marketing groups. Create two separate campaigns, one for version A and one for version B. Keep everything in the campaigns the same except for the element you want to test. Set up your message, implement the changes in version B, randomly add one of the recipient groups to campaign A and add the other to campaign B. Send your message, and wait for the results to come in.  
The idea is that by collecting a database of subscribers we are obtaining their prior permission before we actually send them any marketing information. It means the people you send to will already know you, they have already told you they are interested in what you have to say. It’s called permission marketing, loads of books have been written on the subject, if you want one try Permission Marketing by Seth Godin.
To avoid sharing numbers with other senders, and for brand recognition and number consistency, leasing a dedicated virtual number, which are also known as a long code or long number (international number format, e.g. +44 7624 805000 or US number format,[9] e.g. 757 772 8555), is a viable option. Unlike a shared number, it can receive SMS replies. Senders can choose from a list of available dedicated virtual numbers from a bulk SMS provider. Prices for dedicated virtual numbers can vary. Some numbers, often called Gold numbers, are more easy to recognise, and therefore more expensive to lease. Senders may also get creative and choose a vanity number. These numbers spell out a word using the keypad, like +1-(123)-ANUMBER.
That depends on your leads, your message and what your primary business is that you're selling. We have seen a 70% better response using RVM because the prospect can listen to your message at their leisure and even save that message and listen to it at a later time when their ready to act on your message by going to your website/capture page, calling your 800Link sizzle call or simply emailing you back for more information.
*Ding ding* One new text. Maybe it’s that cute boy you’ve been talking to in chem class. Maybe it’s your boss wanting to congratulate you on your performance. Or maybe, just maybe, it’s an irresistible text offer from your favorite retail chain. What’s the first thing you do? Open it, duh. If you swipe left and delete the message before even reading it — well kudos to you, you’re a borderline extraterrestrial. Personally, I can’t remember the last time I didn’t open a text message, and I’m sure you can agree.
Sending text messages to phone numbers of owners who have not opted-in to your SMS campaign is an illegal practice. It is a violation of federal law under the TCPA, and it can result in costly lawsuits. Consumers can sue you for sending them unsolicited messages, and they can claim between $500 and $1,500 for every unwanted text message that you have send to them.
Once you've collected your mobile numbers, verified that you have followed all of your legal responsibilities you can start your SMS marketing campaign. I'd suggest using a 3rd party service provider to ensure that you are able to track the return on investment for your campaign, embed an unsubscribe message, and easily manage your SMS marketing database including unsubscribes. 
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