MMS mobile marketing can contain a timed slideshow of images, text, audio and video. This mobile content is delivered via MMS (Multimedia Message Service). Nearly all new phones produced with a color screen are capable of sending and receiving standard MMS message. Brands are able to both send (mobile terminated) and receive (mobile originated) rich content through MMS A2P (application-to-person) mobile networks to mobile subscribers. In some networks, brands are also able to sponsor messages that are sent P2P (person-to-person).
Sending text messages to phone numbers of owners who have not opted-in to your SMS campaign is an illegal practice. It is a violation of federal law under the TCPA, and it can result in costly lawsuits. Consumers can sue you for sending them unsolicited messages, and they can claim between $500 and $1,500 for every unwanted text message that you have send to them.
We’re firm believers that the follow-up is one of the most important elements of the selling process. After you fire off an email looking for an approval or confirmation, a short follow-up by text could be the perfect nudge to get your prospect to take a look. Remember, since 90 percent of text messages are read within a few minutes, there’s a good chance your SMS follow-up will be seen right away and prompt your prospect to answer.
There is no other method that comes close to SMS in terms of reach and reliability. And that goes for their open rates as well. Clients can easily skip over a social media or mobile app push notification that appears briefly on the screen and then disappears. Emails are rarely even opened and when they are, it may be long after the event or promotion you were advertising took place.
Kaplan categorizes mobile marketing along the degree of consumer knowledge and the trigger of communication into four groups: strangers, groupies, victims, and patrons. Consumer knowledge can be high or low and according to its degree organizations can customize their messages to each individual user, similar to the idea of one-to-one marketing. Regarding the trigger of communication, Kaplan differentiates between push communication, initiated by the organization, and pull communication, initiated by the consumer. Within the first group (low knowledge/push), organizations broadcast a general message to a large number of mobile users. Given that the organization cannot know which customers have ultimately been reached by the message, this group is referred to as "strangers". Within the second group (low knowledge/pull), customers opt to receive information but do not identify themselves when doing so. The organizations therefore does not know which specific clients it is dealing with exactly, which is why this cohort is called "groupies". In the third group (high knowledge/push) referred to as "victims", organizations know their customers and can send them messages and information without first asking permission. The last group (high knowledge/pull), the "patrons" covers situations where customers actively give permission to be contacted and provide personal information about themselves, which allows for one-to-one communication without running the risk of annoying them.[45]

That depends on your leads, your message and what your primary business is that you're selling. We have seen a 70% better response using RVM because the prospect can listen to your message at their leisure and even save that message and listen to it at a later time when their ready to act on your message by going to your website/capture page, calling your 800Link sizzle call or simply emailing you back for more information.

First, you collect the opt-in, which 9 times out of 10 will be a 'cold lead', ie., someone (NOT) familiar with you or what you represent. So instead of immediately going into full-on presentation mode, which isn't good for you or your prospect, you create a buffer where the prospect can learn more about YOU in a safe space. The reason this is important nowadays is because your prospect is more interested in you, your story and why you choose to align with your primary program, even more so than his or hers interest in the biz opp itself.
One form of in-game mobile advertising is what allows players to actually play. As a new and effective form of advertising, it allows consumers to try out the content before they actually install it. This type of marketing can also really attract the attention of users like casual players. These advertising blur the lines between game and advertising, and provide players with a richer experience that allows them to spend their precious time interacting with advertising.
Long codes are normal 10-digit phone numbers that can be used to send and receive text messages. They’re the cheapest option for a dedicated number and can be set up in just a couple of minutes, making them a popular choice if you’re on a budget or in a hurry to get started. The biggest advantage of long codes is that they support both domestic and international communications. They’re perfect for global businesses or companies who aspire to be one. However, if the success of your SMS program depends on customers initiating contact with you, you should consider a short code instead.
Kaplan categorizes mobile marketing along the degree of consumer knowledge and the trigger of communication into four groups: strangers, groupies, victims, and patrons. Consumer knowledge can be high or low and according to its degree organizations can customize their messages to each individual user, similar to the idea of one-to-one marketing. Regarding the trigger of communication, Kaplan differentiates between push communication, initiated by the organization, and pull communication, initiated by the consumer. Within the first group (low knowledge/push), organizations broadcast a general message to a large number of mobile users. Given that the organization cannot know which customers have ultimately been reached by the message, this group is referred to as "strangers". Within the second group (low knowledge/pull), customers opt to receive information but do not identify themselves when doing so. The organizations therefore does not know which specific clients it is dealing with exactly, which is why this cohort is called "groupies". In the third group (high knowledge/push) referred to as "victims", organizations know their customers and can send them messages and information without first asking permission. The last group (high knowledge/pull), the "patrons" covers situations where customers actively give permission to be contacted and provide personal information about themselves, which allows for one-to-one communication without running the risk of annoying them.[45]
Our RVM platform are now able to deliver messages to compatible land lines, so we don�t scrub them now, unless specifically asked to do so. A compatible land line is a hard wired phone that uses voicemail service provided by the carrier and not an answering machine. This does not include VOIP services like Skype, Vonage, Google Voice, etc. It�s a good thing, because less numbers (leads) are discarded.
Dunkin Donuts revived some of their failing stores with an SMS campaign that they advertised through online ads and radio. The campaign rewarded customers for sharing the text offers with their friends. By encouraging sharing and word-of-mouth in their promotion, they leveraged their spending on their SMS campaign and managed to provide sufficient incentive that 17% of those who received texts forwarded them and 7,500 people opted in to their loyalty program. The result was a 21% increase in store traffic. Impressive results.
If you’re working with CM.com’s platform, use the Address Book to randomly divide your recipients into two marketing groups. Create two separate campaigns, one for version A and one for version B. Keep everything in the campaigns the same except for the element you want to test. Set up your message, implement the changes in version B, randomly add one of the recipient groups to campaign A and add the other to campaign B. Send your message, and wait for the results to come in.  
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In the competitive consumer-focused world of marketing and advertising, businesses rely on your marketing or ad agency’s creativity and experience to help them outshine their competition and attract new leads. Your agency must demonstrate consistent success and a thorough understanding of consumers across industries in order to win new bids and maintain and grow existing contracts. How will you do it?
The new Telephone Consumer Protection Act guidelines going into effect on October 16th 2013 require written, auditable consent for every consumer in a mobile database whereas previously consent could be express, meaning a company had previously done business with an individual. For those marketers not already using written consent for their opt-in programs, the new guidelines will require a significant change in how they structure their programs. Any company who is sending SMS messages as part of their marketing initiative need to follow the below guidelines:
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