If you’re working with CM.com’s platform, use the Address Book to randomly divide your recipients into two marketing groups. Create two separate campaigns, one for version A and one for version B. Keep everything in the campaigns the same except for the element you want to test. Set up your message, implement the changes in version B, randomly add one of the recipient groups to campaign A and add the other to campaign B. Send your message, and wait for the results to come in.  

Dunkin Donuts revived some of their failing stores with an SMS campaign that they advertised through online ads and radio. The campaign rewarded customers for sharing the text offers with their friends. By encouraging sharing and word-of-mouth in their promotion, they leveraged their spending on their SMS campaign and managed to provide sufficient incentive that 17% of those who received texts forwarded them and 7,500 people opted in to their loyalty program. The result was a 21% increase in store traffic. Impressive results.
Ok, well almost everyone — 90 percent of all text messages are read within three minutes of being received. This isn’t just a fluffy statistic. Recent research gathered by Dynmark.com also suggests that “almost one third of of those targeted with SMS advertising campaigns respond to the correspondence; with almost half of this group going on to make a purchase.” This research totally speaks for itself. And yes, U.S. citizens can register with the do not call registry, but this has nothing to do with the sending and receiving of SMS.

Due to the dynamic nature of (SMS/MMS) marketing technology and the messaging industry, the Messaging Compliance Rules are constantly being updated from time to time. As a result, I’d strongly encourage clients to review vendors’ terms and conditions and proposed use cases with qualified legal counsel to make sure that they comply with all applicable laws.
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