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*Ding ding* One new text. Maybe it’s that cute boy you’ve been talking to in chem class. Maybe it’s your boss wanting to congratulate you on your performance. Or maybe, just maybe, it’s an irresistible text offer from your favorite retail chain. What’s the first thing you do? Open it, duh. If you swipe left and delete the message before even reading it — well kudos to you, you’re a borderline extraterrestrial. Personally, I can’t remember the last time I didn’t open a text message, and I’m sure you can agree.


Long codes are normal 10-digit phone numbers that can be used to send and receive text messages. They’re the cheapest option for a dedicated number and can be set up in just a couple of minutes, making them a popular choice if you’re on a budget or in a hurry to get started. The biggest advantage of long codes is that they support both domestic and international communications. They’re perfect for global businesses or companies who aspire to be one. However, if the success of your SMS program depends on customers initiating contact with you, you should consider a short code instead.
For example, it cost $99.95 to purchase 3,245 successfully delivered RVMs. We can normally deliver RVMs to about 70% of the numbers that are dialed. If you send us a list of 7,700 numbers, chances are that about 60% of them (4620) are cell phones. If we are able to successfully deliver RVMs to 70% of them that would be about 3234 successfully delivered RVMs. That is just 13 less than the amount you can purchase for $99.95.

Sample size indicates the size of the group of people who are going to receive your message. The size of this group and the amount of conversions you’re getting determines the significance of your test. Significance refers to whether we can rely on the made changes to have generated these results, or whether we can’t rely on the changes, but see that the results were simply due to chance. What this really means is that we want to be able to say: we can be 95% sure that the changes we made will improve our conversion rate. 
The new Telephone Consumer Protection Act guidelines going into effect on October 16th 2013 require written, auditable consent for every consumer in a mobile database whereas previously consent could be express, meaning a company had previously done business with an individual. For those marketers not already using written consent for their opt-in programs, the new guidelines will require a significant change in how they structure their programs. Any company who is sending SMS messages as part of their marketing initiative need to follow the below guidelines:
In a nutshell, mobile devices are arguably the most personal items we own and as (SMS/MMS) marketer building your phone number database in the early stages of your (SMS/MMS) campaign, you need to let subscribers know what they are opt-in for. keep your promise and send only infrequent, valuable text messages. Remember to keep delivering value through incentives and your customers will stay opted-in and very eager to receive your next text.
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