A custom sender ID, also known as an alphanumeric sender ID, enables users to set a business name as the sender ID for one way organisation-to-consumer messages. This is only supported in certain countries and are up to 11 characters long, and support uppercase and lowercase ASCII letters and digits 0-9.[12] Senders aren’t allowed to use digits only as this would mimic a shortcode or virtual number that they don’t have access to. Reputable bulk SMS providers will check customer sender IDs beforehand to make sure senders are not misusing or abusing them.
Businesses have been collecting customer information for years by offering a birthday freebie, i.e. a free product or service on your birthday. Customers are more likely to trust you with their phone number if they get some sort of reward in return. You can also send them one-month, six-month, or one-year “anniversary” bonuses based on their sign-up date.
Kaplan categorizes mobile marketing along the degree of consumer knowledge and the trigger of communication into four groups: strangers, groupies, victims, and patrons. Consumer knowledge can be high or low and according to its degree organizations can customize their messages to each individual user, similar to the idea of one-to-one marketing. Regarding the trigger of communication, Kaplan differentiates between push communication, initiated by the organization, and pull communication, initiated by the consumer. Within the first group (low knowledge/push), organizations broadcast a general message to a large number of mobile users. Given that the organization cannot know which customers have ultimately been reached by the message, this group is referred to as "strangers". Within the second group (low knowledge/pull), customers opt to receive information but do not identify themselves when doing so. The organizations therefore does not know which specific clients it is dealing with exactly, which is why this cohort is called "groupies". In the third group (high knowledge/push) referred to as "victims", organizations know their customers and can send them messages and information without first asking permission. The last group (high knowledge/pull), the "patrons" covers situations where customers actively give permission to be contacted and provide personal information about themselves, which allows for one-to-one communication without running the risk of annoying them.[45]
In the article cited at the beginning of this post, the author boldly claims that “a major chunk of the population is already registered with the DND.” First, there is no clear statistical research backing up this assumption. Second, in the U.S., the Do Not Call registry protects consumers from just that — unwanted calls. It’s designed to prevent telemarketers from harassing consumers. This has absolutely nothing to do with text messaging. Now, if for some reason you do find yourself receiving unwanted text messages, you can file a complaint. But, knowing the permission-based nature of this marketing method, you may never confront this issue.
The system default setting is to not scrub against the national or any state DNC registries. Since you are not dialing a number, conducting a call over a landline or cellular network, and not causing a phone to ring, it is not necessary to scrub against DNC registries. However, if you want us to change the settings for your account to scrub against them, just let us know.
Due to the dynamic nature of (SMS/MMS) marketing technology and the messaging industry, the Messaging Compliance Rules are constantly being updated from time to time. As a result, I’d strongly encourage clients to review vendors’ terms and conditions and proposed use cases with qualified legal counsel to make sure that they comply with all applicable laws.
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