Whether you post the offer in your local business, on your Facebook page, or, preferably, both, don’t start off with “Give us your phone number.” Phrase the offer with something along the lines of “Join our inner circle to receive advance notice of sales and promotions, exclusive mobile coupons, and one-day only offers.” Customers should feel that by signing up for your text messages they will get perks and benefits that other customers won’t be privy to.
Once your test is complete, you can analyse the results to determine whether the results confirm your hypothesis. Keep sample size and significance in mind so you never draw conclusions based on effects that resulted by chance. For example, if all conditions besides the test variable were the same and version A was sent out to 2000 recipients and had 3 conversions, and version B was also sent out to 2000 recipients but had 60 conversions, it’s safe to say that version B has performed significantly better. If you want to be sure about the significance of your results, you can always use a significance calculator.   

Kaplan categorizes mobile marketing along the degree of consumer knowledge and the trigger of communication into four groups: strangers, groupies, victims, and patrons. Consumer knowledge can be high or low and according to its degree organizations can customize their messages to each individual user, similar to the idea of one-to-one marketing. Regarding the trigger of communication, Kaplan differentiates between push communication, initiated by the organization, and pull communication, initiated by the consumer. Within the first group (low knowledge/push), organizations broadcast a general message to a large number of mobile users. Given that the organization cannot know which customers have ultimately been reached by the message, this group is referred to as "strangers". Within the second group (low knowledge/pull), customers opt to receive information but do not identify themselves when doing so. The organizations therefore does not know which specific clients it is dealing with exactly, which is why this cohort is called "groupies". In the third group (high knowledge/push) referred to as "victims", organizations know their customers and can send them messages and information without first asking permission. The last group (high knowledge/pull), the "patrons" covers situations where customers actively give permission to be contacted and provide personal information about themselves, which allows for one-to-one communication without running the risk of annoying them.[45]
It’s mobile marketing month here at Insivia and one of the questions we always get from out clients is whether or not our clients should be capturing mobile phone numbers from their customers to use in future forms of SMS marketing. A lot of the times it’s thought of being too intrusive but I’m here to tell you otherwise. For a lot of businesses collecting mobile phone numbers is a great opportunity for you. With SMS messaging over 95% of all SMS text messages that are sent are opened by the end user. As opposed to email where it’s about 6-15% of those emails are read. Mobile marketing and text message marketing is a great opportunity to directly interact with your customer. One of the best ways to do it is to include an opt-in for a mobile phone number on your opt in forms and your other marketing materials giving your customers the ability to give you their phone number to receive SMS interactions from your business. One of the things that I would not recommend is making this a mandatory requirement for people to give you their cell phone number but leave it to them as an option. If somebody wants to receive mobile messages from you, you want to give them an opportunity because the success rate is so high when working with SMS and direct message marketing.
Collecting phone numbers at your brick and mortar place of business is as simple as filling out forms or collecting business cards, but what about online? Again, that can be as simple as asking customers to email or text you their information, or you can go high-tech and actually set up an online form, linked from your website, Facebook page, or even advertising links.
Whether you post the offer in your local business, on your Facebook page, or, preferably, both, don’t start off with “Give us your phone number.” Phrase the offer with something along the lines of “Join our inner circle to receive advance notice of sales and promotions, exclusive mobile coupons, and one-day only offers.” Customers should feel that by signing up for your text messages they will get perks and benefits that other customers won’t be privy to.
There is no other method that comes close to SMS in terms of reach and reliability. And that goes for their open rates as well. Clients can easily skip over a social media or mobile app push notification that appears briefly on the screen and then disappears. Emails are rarely even opened and when they are, it may be long after the event or promotion you were advertising took place.
If your open rate is low, your goal will be to start improving that. If there are multiple parts of your message that you would like to improve, start with identifying the most important one. If, for example, your open rate and click-through-rate of the message’s contents are low, it would be better to first work on the open rate. After all, no one is going to see your improved content if no one is opening it in the first place. So, determine your goal and let that direct your focus towards the thing that needs improvement most.  
For example, it cost $99.95 to purchase 3,245 successfully delivered RVMs. We can normally deliver RVMs to about 70% of the numbers that are dialed. If you send us a list of 7,700 numbers, chances are that about 60% of them (4620) are cell phones. If we are able to successfully deliver RVMs to 70% of them that would be about 3234 successfully delivered RVMs. That is just 13 less than the amount you can purchase for $99.95.

Once you have done the analysis, determined your goal and formulated your hypothesis, it’s time to set up your test. The best way is to do an A/B test. An A/B test compares version A (the original version) to changes made in a version B while all other conditions are kept the same. If you send the test to a big enough group of recipients and all conditions (e.g. time of day, day in the week, type of audience etc.) are kept the same, an A/B test will let you conclude whether the results can be attributed to the made changes or whether they happened due to chance. 

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Push notifications were first introduced to smartphones by Apple with the Push Notification Service in 2009.[23] For Android devices, Google developed Android Cloud to Messaging or C2DM in 2010. Google replaced this service with Google Cloud Messaging in 2013.[24] Commonly referred to as GCM, Google Cloud Messaging served as C2DM's successor, making improvements to authentication and delivery, new API endpoints and messaging parameters, and the removal of limitations on API send-rates and message sizes. It is a message that pops up on a mobile device. It is the delivery of information from a software application to a computing device without any request from the client or the user. They look like SMS notifications but they are reached only the users who installed the app. The specifications vary for iOS and android users. SMS and push notifications can be part of a well-developed inbound mobile marketing strategy.
The benefit of using a form, whether paper or online, is that you can use it to determine customer preferences in order to help you categorize your phone lists. For instance if you’re a spa that offers a variety of services, you might ask the customer to check off which services they are most interested in. Text messages are easier to send, however, so be sure to give customers that option as well.
The issue of trust is the great advantage that lies at the heart of SMS marketing. Because people are reluctant to give out their numbers, few businesses have those numbers, and so fewer marketing texts are sent compared with marketing emails. The result is that customers are unlikely to get bored with marketing texts the way they've become bored by marketing emails.
In the competitive consumer-focused world of marketing and advertising, businesses rely on your marketing or ad agency’s creativity and experience to help them outshine their competition and attract new leads. Your agency must demonstrate consistent success and a thorough understanding of consumers across industries in order to win new bids and maintain and grow existing contracts. How will you do it?
In a nutshell, mobile devices are arguably the most personal items we own and as (SMS/MMS) marketer building your phone number database in the early stages of your (SMS/MMS) campaign, you need to let subscribers know what they are opt-in for. keep your promise and send only infrequent, valuable text messages. Remember to keep delivering value through incentives and your customers will stay opted-in and very eager to receive your next text.
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