*Ding ding* One new text. Maybe it’s that cute boy you’ve been talking to in chem class. Maybe it’s your boss wanting to congratulate you on your performance. Or maybe, just maybe, it’s an irresistible text offer from your favorite retail chain. What’s the first thing you do? Open it, duh. If you swipe left and delete the message before even reading it — well kudos to you, you’re a borderline extraterrestrial. Personally, I can’t remember the last time I didn’t open a text message, and I’m sure you can agree.
First, you collect the opt-in, which 9 times out of 10 will be a 'cold lead', ie., someone (NOT) familiar with you or what you represent. So instead of immediately going into full-on presentation mode, which isn't good for you or your prospect, you create a buffer where the prospect can learn more about YOU in a safe space. The reason this is important nowadays is because your prospect is more interested in you, your story and why you choose to align with your primary program, even more so than his or hers interest in the biz opp itself.
In Europe the first cross-carrier SMS shortcode campaign was run by Txtbomb in 2001 for an Island Records release, In North America it was the Labatt Brewing Company in 2002. Over the past few years mobile short codes have been increasingly popular as a new channel to communicate to the mobile consumer. Brands have begun to treat the mobile short code as a mobile domain name allowing the consumer to text message the brand at an event, in store and off any traditional media.
Kaplan categorizes mobile marketing along the degree of consumer knowledge and the trigger of communication into four groups: strangers, groupies, victims, and patrons. Consumer knowledge can be high or low and according to its degree organizations can customize their messages to each individual user, similar to the idea of one-to-one marketing. Regarding the trigger of communication, Kaplan differentiates between push communication, initiated by the organization, and pull communication, initiated by the consumer. Within the first group (low knowledge/push), organizations broadcast a general message to a large number of mobile users. Given that the organization cannot know which customers have ultimately been reached by the message, this group is referred to as "strangers". Within the second group (low knowledge/pull), customers opt to receive information but do not identify themselves when doing so. The organizations therefore does not know which specific clients it is dealing with exactly, which is why this cohort is called "groupies". In the third group (high knowledge/push) referred to as "victims", organizations know their customers and can send them messages and information without first asking permission. The last group (high knowledge/pull), the "patrons" covers situations where customers actively give permission to be contacted and provide personal information about themselves, which allows for one-to-one communication without running the risk of annoying them.[45]
This is why they designed their own customized queue logic and set up intelligent call routing flows. With the new routing logic Apartment List was able to classify the caller need and assign them to the right agent. Minimizing wait times and maximizing efficiency, the online directory has drastically increased call volume and improved customer satisfaction.
By now, you have a pretty clear idea of what you need to improve to reach your goal. But how are you going to do that? You need to form a hypothesis about what you think would work better than the message you have now. You may already have some ideas about things that might work based on previous experiences. Or you may have no idea where to start. You can start with evaluating some email/SMS marketing best practices and see whether these would fit for your business. You will only know whether these are suitable for you once you start testing, but it gives you a solid starting point. 
In order to start a conversation with a text message, it has to be personal, so this is the best method available to start a conversation with someone from whom you have a cell phone number. They can reply to your first text message directly back to you and you can take on the conversation from there (i.e. for a big ticket, don't use a robot, your prospect is an individual, like you, that you want to respect.)
The easiest and most efficient way of sending an SMS marketing campaign is through a bulk SMS service provider. Enterprise-grade SMS providers will usually allow new customers the option to sign-up for a free trial account before committing to their platform. Reputable companies also offer free spam compliance, real-time reporting, link tracking, SMS API,[19] multiple integration options, and a 100% delivery guarantee. Most providers can provide link shorteners and built-in analytics to help track the return on investment of each campaign.
Texting is immediate, with nearly 100% of texts being opened and 93% of them being opened within 3 minutes of being received. You’re pretty much guaranteed that at least the first step required for lead generation, reaching your customer, is covered with SMS. In addition to the open rates, texting has another benefit. It puts the power of decision in the customer’s hands.
In order to gain their mobile number, they will have to have a great deal of trust in you and a pre-existing relationship will help. They also need to know that what you'll be sending them via SMS message is exclusive offers, not the same offer that you give via email and social media. Be clear with your customers and use the following guidelines when introducing SMS marketing to your customers:
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